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Barry's Wild Persimmon Pudding II

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Barry's Wild Persimmon Pudding II (click here for recipe with metric measurements)

Note: This is an October 2008 modification of my earlier recipe and uses less spice, baking powder and sugar.  It is a little less sweet but showcases the persimmon flavor a little more. This recipe is designed for common, or American persimmons (Diospyros virginiana).  If you wish to use the asian persimmons (Diospyros kaki), there are additional considerations noted below.
Preheat the oven to 325 F - I use glass baking dishes as they help caramelize the edges.  If you use metal or silicone, you'll need to set the oven for 350 F.   Lightly grease two 8” X 8” pans. 

In a large bowl combine:                   

2 Cups flour           
1.25 teaspoons baking powder   
teaspoon baking soda       
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
teaspoon ground nutmeg OR 1/8-1/4 teaspoon ground mace

Additional considerations if using asian persimmons:

        1)  add another tablespoon or two of flour (will depend on moisture)
        2)  add another teaspoon baking powder
        3)  add another teaspoon baking soda

Thoroughly mix these dry ingredients with a whisk.

In another large bowl combine:

2 Cups persimmon pulp
13  Cups sugar 
Stick softened unsalted butter
3 Cups skim milk
2 jumbo or extra large eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

Cream  together these wet ingredients.  Then slowly beat in the dry ingredients.  Some slight lumpiness from the persimmon pulp or butter is OK.  Pour the batter equally into the two baking dishes and bake in the oven for about an hour or until a toothpick comes out clean and the edges get slightly caramelized.  When removed from the oven, they usually fall and pull the caramelized edges inward.  Let the pudding set up for about 20-30 minutes.  Serve slightly warm with just a little really good quality Vanilla Ice Cream.  Better still… let it set up for a half a day and then serve slightly warm with the ice cream.

NOTES:

OPTIONS: In the past few years I've been using Mace instead of most of the spice above.  As with cloves, if you use Mace, be very careful not to use a lot as it may easily overpower the persimmon flavor.  Another spice I've been experimenting with is
Lindera benzoin (spicebush) berries.  It has a nice flavor, but I haven't really pinned down the amount just yet.  If you use spicebush, please drop me a line and tell me what you think.

You can cut the recipe in half if you like but I recommend making the whole thing and freezing what you can’t use quickly.  Persimmon pulp freezes well so take advantage of the persimmons while you can get them and you can make this Fall treat year round!

Common persimmons have a richer flavor, but asian persimmons may also be used.  Varieties of asian persimmons,
Diospyros kaki Linn., fall into two basic categories: astringent and non-astringent. 

Those that are astringent (examples: Hachiya, & Saijo) are similar to the wild persimmons of North America, Diospyros virginiana L. and must be eaten when fully ripe and soft in order to rid the fruits of the astringency.  Contrary to popular belief, you do not need to wait until frost occurs for our wild persimmons to be rid of their astringency.  In fact, many areas within the American persimmon's natural range seldom experience frost.  Bletting is the process by which one can remove astringency in persimmons.  This is usually accomplished after harvesting by freezing them for several days.

Asian persimmons that are not astringent (examples: Fuyu, Izu, & Saruga) can be pulped and eaten while soft (as those above) or eaten hard and crisp like apples. 



Barry's Wild Persimmon Pudding II (metric measurements)

Note: this recipe is designed for common, or American persimmons (Diospyros virginiana).  If you wish to use the asian persimmons (Diospyros kaki), there are additional considerations noted below.
Preheat the oven to 177 C  - I use glass baking dishes as they help caramelize the edges.  If you use metal or silicone, you'll need to set the oven for 163 C.   Lightly grease two 20 x 20 cm pans. 

In a large bowl combine:                   

240 g flour           
6.25 ml baking powder   
2.5 ml baking soda       
5 ml salt
5 ml ground cinnamon
1.25 ml ground nutmeg OR 62.5-1.25 mL 1/8-1/4 teaspoon ground mace

Additional considerations if using asian persimmons:

        1)  add another 15-30 ml flour (will depend on moisture)
        2)  add another 1.25 ml baking powder
        3)  add another 1.25 ml baking soda

Thoroughly mix these dry ingredients with a whisk.

In another large bowl combine:

480 ml persimmon pulp
265 g sugar 
90 g softened unsalted butter
720 ml skim milk
2 jumbo or extra large eggs
5 mL vanilla extract (optional)

Cream  together these wet ingredients.  Then slowly beat in the dry ingredients.  Some slight lumpiness from the persimmon pulp or butter is OK.  Pour the batter equally into the two baking dishes and bake in the oven for about an hour or until a toothpick comes out clean and the edges get slightly caramelized.  When removed from the oven, they usually fall and pull the caramelized edges inward.  Let the pudding set up for about 20-30 minutes.  Serve slightly warm with just a little really good quality Vanilla Ice Cream.  Better still… let it set up for a half a day and then serve slightly warm with the ice cream.

NOTES:

OPTIONS: In the past few years I've been using Mace instead of most of the spice above.  As with cloves, if you use Mace, be very careful not to use a lot as it may easily overpower the persimmon flavor.  Another spice I've been experimenting with 
is Lindera benzoin (spicebush) berries.  It has a nice flavor, but I haven't really pinned down the amount just yet.  If you use spicebush, please drop me a line and tell me what you think.

You can cut the recipe in half if you like but I recommend making the whole thing and freezing what you can’t use quickly.  Persimmon pulp freezes well so take advantage of the persimmons while you can get them and you can make this Fall treat year round!

Common persimmons have a richer flavor, but asian persimmons may also be used.  Varieties of asian persimmons,
Diospyros kaki Linn., fall into two basic categories: astringent and non-astringent. 

Those that are astringent (examples: Hachiya, & Saijo) are similar to the wild persimmons of North America, Diospyros virginiana L. and must be eaten when fully ripe and soft in order to rid the fruits of the astringency.  Contrary to popular belief, you do not need to wait until frost occurs for our wild persimmons to be rid of their astringency.  In fact, many areas within the American persimmon's natural range seldom experience frost.  Bletting is the process by which one can remove astringency in persimmons.  This is usually accomplished after harvesting by freezing them for several days.

Asian persimmons that are not astringent (examples: Fuyu, Izu, & Saruga) can be pulped and eaten while soft (as those above) or eaten hard and crisp like apples.