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Euell Gibbons' Persimmon Beer

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Persimmon Beer (click here for recipe with metric measurements)

This recipe, was offered by Euell Gibbons in his 1962 book, "Stalking The Wild Asparagus".  Euell said, "I think it is a waste of good persimmons, but I have some friends who always very willingly dispose of any I make."  This recipe is used by permission.

Ingredients:

10 pounds of wheat bran
1 gallon of pulp from very ripe persimmons

Bake this mixture like pones of cornbread until it is brown and firm.  Break the pones into small pieces and put through a food chopper using a coarse plate.  Dump the ground mixture into a 5 gallon crock and fill the crock not quite full of boiling water.  

As soon as the crock cools to the point of barely being warm, stir in 1 package of dry yeast mixed with a little of the liquid from the crock.  Keep the crock covered with a cloth.  It will ferment furiously for a few days but keep watching it and in about a week it will start settling down.  The moment it becomes still and clear, bottle and cap it tightly.  Store it in a cool, dark place an in about 3 weeks it will be ready to use.

Persimmon Beer (metric measurements)

This recipe, is from Euell Gibbons in his 1962 book, "Stalking The Wild Asparagus".  This recipe is used by permission.

Ingredients:

4.54 kg of wheat bran
4 L of pulp from very ripe persimmons

Bake this mixture like pones of cornbread until it is brown and firm.  Break the pones into small pieces and put through a food chopper using a coarse plate.  Dump the ground mixture into a 19 L crock and fill the crock not quite full of boiling water.  

As soon as the crock cools to the point of barely being warm, stir in 1 package of dry yeast mixed with a little of the liquid from the crock.  Keep the crock covered with a cloth.  It will ferment furiously for a few days but keep watching it and in about a week it will start settling down.  The moment it becomes still and clear, bottle and cap it tightly.  Store it in a cool, dark place an in about 3 weeks it will be ready to use.


Bibliography:

Gibbons, Euell. 1962. Stalking the Wild Asparagus. pp. 164-169.  $17.50 from Alan C. Hood & Co., Inc. (www.hoodbooks.com), used by permission.